Center for Meteorite Studies

Look no further astronomy lovers, the School of Earth and Space Exploration at ASU is hosting a Solar Eclipse 2017 viewing experience on Monday, Aug. 21 from 9 a.m. to noon. Join us on Hayden Lawn or in Interdisciplinary Science and Technology Building IV on the Tempe campus for this rare, celestial event as we peer through solar telescopes and sport brand-new, free, ASU solar-safe viewing glasses. Plus, there will be live NASA coverage of the event and more interactive displays inside ISTB4, too.

Don’t miss out on this fun, free, safe — no burning corneas here — solar eclipse viewing experience. 

In this series of still from 2013, the eclipse sequence runs from right to left. The center image shows totality; on either side are the 2nd contact (right) and 3rd contact (left diamond rings that mark the beginning and end of totality respectively)In this series of still from 2013, the eclipse sequence runs from right to left. The center image shows totality; on either side are the 2nd contact (right) and 3rd contact (left diamond rings that mark the beginning and end of totality respectively). Image Credit: Rick Fienberg, TravelQuest International and Wilderness Travel

Location and parking

ASU's Interdisciplinary Science and Technology Building IV is the home of the School of Earth and Space Exploration. ISTB 4 is near the intersection of Rural and Terrace Road in Tempe on the east side of campus. This seven-story structure is ASU’s largest research facility and is accessible on foot via Orange Street and McAllister Avenue. If arriving by light rail, exit at the University and Rural Road stop.

The Rural Road parking structure is the closest parking to ISTB 4 and is a short walk to Hayden Lawn. Parking is available for $3 per hour inside the Rural Road parking structure. From the parking structure, walk west and enter ISTB 4 through the glass doors on the north side of the building. Please note that a parking fee is charged upon exit. 

View a map of ISTB 4 and nearby visitor parking and click here for additional directions.

Eclipse: Who, what, when, where and how?

On Monday, Aug. 21,, all of North America will be treated to an eclipse of the sun. Anyone within the path of totality can see one of nature’s most awe-inspiring sights — a total solar eclipse. This path, where the moon will completely cover the sun and the sun's tenuous atmosphere — the corona — can be seen, will stretch from Lincoln Beach, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. Observers outside this path will still see a partial solar eclipse where the moon covers part of the sun's disk.

Who can see it?

Lots of people! Everyone in the contiguous United States, in fact, everyone in North America plus parts of South America, Africa, and Europe will see at least a partial solar eclipse, while the thin path of totality will pass through portions of 14 states.  
This map shows the globe view of the path of totality for the August 21, 2017 total solar eclipse.

This map shows the globe view of  the path of totality for the August 21, 2017 total solar eclipse. You can find more information at: https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/4518Image Credit: NASA’s Scientific Visualization Studio

What is It?

This celestial event is a solar eclipse in which the moon passes between the sun and Earth and blocks all or part of the sun for up to about three hours, from beginning to end, as viewed from a given location.  For this eclipse, the longest period when the moon completely blocks the sun from any given location along the path will be about two minutes and 40 seconds.  The last time the contiguous U.S. saw a total eclipse was in 1979.

Diagram showing the Earth-sun-moon geometry of a total solar eclipse.

Diagram showing the Earth-sun-moon geometry of a total solar eclipse. Not to scale: If drawn to scale, the Moon would be 30 Earth diameters away. The sun would be 400 times that distance.

Where can you see it?

You can see a partial eclipse, where the moon covers only a part of the sun, anywhere in North America (see “Who can see it?”). To see a total eclipse, where the moon fully covers the sun for a short few minutes, you must be in the path of totality. The path of totality is a relatively thin ribbon, around 70 miles wide, that will cross the U.S. from West to East.  The first point of contact will be at Lincoln Beach, Oregon at 9:05 a.m. PDT. Totality begins there at 10:16 a.m. PDT.  Over the next hour and a half, it will cross through Oregon, Idaho, Wyoming, Montana, Nebraska, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, and North and South Carolina.  The total eclipse will end near Charleston, South Carolina at 2:48 p.m. EDT.  From there the lunar shadow leaves the United States at 4:09 EDT.  Its longest duration will be near Carbondale, Illinois, where the sun will be completely covered for two minutes and 40 seconds.


A map of the United States showing the path of totality for the August 21, 2017 total solar eclipse.
A map of the United States showing the path of totality for the August 21, 2017 total solar eclipse.

How can you see it?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You never want to look directly at the sun without appropriate protection except during totality.  That could severely hurt your eyes.  However, there are many ways to safely view an eclipse of the sun including direct viewing – which requires some type of filtering device and indirect viewing where you project an image of the sun onto a screen. Both methods should produce clear images of the partial phase of an eclipse.  Click here for eclipse viewing techniques and safety.


Check with local science museums, schools and astronomy clubs for eclipse glasses—or purchase an ISO 12312-2 compliant and CE certified pair of these special shades!
Check with local science museums, schools and astronomy clubs for eclipse glasses—or purchase an ISO 12312-2 compliant and CE certified pair of these special shades! 

This list describes when to wear your glasses and when you can safely look at the eclipse, only during totality!

For More Information Contact:

Stephanee Germaine
School of Earth and Space Exploration
stephanee.germaine@asu.edu
480-727-4662 https://sese.asu.edu/

 


Category: Event

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