CMS News

Center Researcher on Prescott fireball

Meteorite Collection Manager Dr. Laurence Garvie was recently featured on ABC 15 news, providing subject matter expertise on a fireball observed north of Prescott, Arizona, February 16th.

Over 65 witnesses to the event have logged details on the American Meteor Society website, and the Yavapai Sheriff's Office received reports from several local residents who heard a loud boom at the time.

 

Support the Center on Sun Devil Giving Day – Mar 19

 
March 19 is Sun Devil Giving Day – 24 hours to show the world what you can accomplish when you join forces to support Arizona State University!
 
This day of giving is a way for you to support the Center for Meteorite Studies (CMS). Every dollar counts, and your gift helps support our pursuit of new knowledge about the origin of our Solar System through the study of meteorites and other planetary materials in a variety of ways, including ­ research initiatives, conservation and growth of the Center's meteorite collection, and educational activities.
 
You can choose to support the Center by visiting the CMS giving page anytime on March 19!
 
Check out real-time fundraising totals and your chances to double your investment on the Sun Devil Giving Day website!
You can get ready for Sun Devil Giving Day today:
  • Follow the Center for Meteorite Studies and ASU Foundation on Facebook and Twitter for the latest Sun Devil Giving Day announcements and contest information.
  • Tell your friends about Sun Devil Giving Day so they can be a part of the celebration.
Sun Devil Giving DayIndividually, each of us is part of ASU’s rich tradition of giving.  Collectively, we are changing the world and expanding our universe.
 
Join us on March 19 as we show the world what the Sun Devil Nation can do when we give together!
 
All funds will be deposited with the ASU Foundation for A New American University, a non-profit organization that exists to support Arizona State University (ASU). Gifts in support of ASU are subject to foundation policies and fees. Your gift may be considered a charitable contribution. Please consult your tax advisor regarding the deductibility of charitable contributions.

Nininger Meteorite Award application deadline extended to April 3

The application deadline for the 2019 Nininger Meteorite Award has been extended to April 3rd!
 
H. H. Nininger
H.H. Nininger (Photo copyright 1972, Paul S. Eriksson, Inc.)
The Nininger Meteorite Award recognizes outstanding student achievement in the meteoritical sciences as embodied by an original research paper. Papers must cover original research conducted by the student and must have been written, submitted, or published between January 1, 2019 and December 31, 2019.
 
The 2019 Nininger Meteorite Award application deadline is midnight (MST) April 3, 2020. Applicants must be the first, but not sole, author of the paper and must be studying at an educational institution in the United States.
 
The Nininger Meteorite Award recipient receives $1,000 and an engraved plaque commemorating the honor.
 
 

New paper on acapulcoite-lodranite meteorite group

Center Assistant Research Scientist Dr. Jemma Davidson and Center Interim Director Dr. Devin Schrader are co-authors of a new paper on the origins of the acapulcoite-lodranite family.

As defined by the Meteoritical Society, these equigranular primitive achondrites show subchondritic compositions, with mineral assemblages similar to, but distinct from, ordinary chondrites. Acapulcoites are finer grained than lodranites and some rare members contain relict chondrules. Based on their bulk composition and broadly chondritic mineralogy, acapulcoite-lodranite likely formed as the result of partial melting of a chondritic precursor.

The meteorite described in the paper, GRV 020043, contains more chondrules than any other acapulcoite-lodranite, and is the least heated member of the acapulcoite-lodranite family studied to date. The authors, therefore, infer that GRV 020043 may, in fact, represent the chondritic precursor to the acapulcoite-lodranite group and, thus, provide invaluable insight into this unique meteorite group.

The paper, “Grove Mountains (GRV) 020043: Insights into acapulcoite-lodranite genesis from the most primitive member”, is published in the journal Geochemistry, and available to read, free of charge until January 11, 2020.

Lodran meteoritePhoto: Lodran meteorite; copyright ASU/CMS.

McCoy T. J., Corrigan C. M., Dickinson T. L., Benedix G. K., Schrader D. L., and Davidson J. (2019) Grove Mountains (GRV) 020043: Insights into Acapulcoite-Lodranite genesis from the most primitive member.  Geochemistry 79: 125536.

 

2020 Nininger Student Travel Award application open

The Center for Meteorite Studies at Arizona State University is pleased to announce the application opportunity for the 2020 Nininger Student Travel Award for undergraduate and graduate students pursuing research in meteoritics and planetary sciences.

The Nininger Student Travel Award supports travel to the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference (LPSC) of up to 4 School of Earth & Space Exploration undergraduate and graduate students to present their latest results.

For details on the award and application process, click here!

Apply for Nininger Meteorite Award

The Center for Meteorite Studies at Arizona State University is accepting applications for the 2019 Nininger Meteorite Award for undergraduate and graduate students pursuing research in meteoritical sciences until April 3!
 
The Nininger Meteorite Award recognizes outstanding student achievement in the meteoritical sciences as embodied by an original research paper.  Papers must cover original research conducted by the student and must have been written, submitted, or published between January 1, 2019 and December 31, 2019.
 
The 2019 Nininger Meteorite Award application deadline is April 3, 2020.  Applicants must be the first, but not sole, author of the paper and must have been studying at an educational institution in the United States at the time the paper was written, submitted, or published.
 
The Nininger Meteorite Award recipient receives $1,000 and an engraved plaque commemorating the honor.
 

Center receives Martian gift

What's better than a Martian meteorite?  Two Martian meteorites!
 
The Center for Meteorite Studies was recently gifted two pieces of the meteorite popularly known as Black Beauty (NWA 7034 and NWA 10922), which is a type of rock from Mars described as a polymict breccia
 
According to the Meteoritical Bulletin (MB 105) description of NWA 10922:
The stone appears to have been sitting in the desert soil only half exposed for a relatively long time, as one side appeared smoothed and shiny, with a sand-blasted, black exterior, while the other side was covered with light-yellow caliche. Upon removal of the caliche with diluted glacial acetic acid, a preserved, brown colored, glassy, flow-lined, fusion crust was revealed.
NWA 10922
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
These two pieces, NWA 7034 (77.1 g, left) and NWA 10922 (67.2 g, right) are the generous gifts of Jay Piatek. Photo: ASU/CMS.
 
Black Beauty is a polymict breccia containing a diverse assemblage of igneous and "sedimentary" materials. The meteorite records a complicated history of volcanic processes, low-temperature alteration, and impact processing on Mars.
 
The bulk chemical composition of NWA 7034 closely matches that of the Martian crust as measured by NASA's Mars Exploration Rovers and Mars Odyssey Orbiter. It also contains more water (approximately 0.6 wt%) than any other known Martian meteorite.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
This video was made from CT scans of a slice (45 mm x 55 mm x 4 mm) of the NWA 7034 (AKA “Black Beauty”) Martian meteorite from the ASU Center for Meteorite Studies collection. The CT imaging of this meteorite slice was performed at the American Museum of Natural History, New York.

Center alumna headed to Antarctica

Having successfully defended her dissertation in September, Center alumna Dr. Emilie Dunham is preparing to collect meteorites from Antarctica this week!

As a member of the US-led Antarctic Search for Meteorites program (ANSMET), she'll be collecting meteorites from stranding surfaces along the Transantarctic Mountains. To date, ANSMET has recovered over 22,000 meteorites – these meteorites are used by scientists around the world, whose research is leading to new knowledge of the early Solar System and providing invaluable insight into its geologic history.

Photo: Dr. Emilie Dunham presents her research at the annual Lunar and Planetary Science Conference. ASU/CMS.

You can follow the 2019-20 ANSMET team members via their blog and learn about their preparation for living in extreme cold, what makes Antarctica such a great location to collect meteorites, and the team's progress through the field season.

Dr. Dunham is not the first to make the journey from hot Arizona desert to cold Antarctic desert; in 2012-13, ASU Professors Meenakshi Wadhwa (then Director of the Center for Meteorite Studies) and Tom Sharp were part of an ANSMET team that took 25,000 pounds of gear – including tents, snow mobiles, meteorite collection equipment, solar panels, fuel, cooking stoves and food – for six weeks of remote field camping in extreme cold conditions. Read more about their experience here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo: Prof. Meenakshi Wadhwa at ANSMET campsite, Mount Bumstead. ASU/SESE.

 

 

Nininger Meteorite Award Deadline

Update: The application deadline for the Nininger Meteorite Award has been extended to April 3, 2020.
 
The Center for Meteorite Studies at Arizona State University is currently accepting applications for the 2019 Nininger Meteorite Award for undergraduate and graduate students pursuing research in meteoritical sciences!
 
The Nininger Meteorite Award recognizes outstanding student achievement in the meteoritical sciences as embodied by an original research paper.  Papers must cover original research conducted by the student and must have been written, submitted, or published between January 1, 2019 and December 31, 2019.
 
The 2019 Nininger Meteorite Award application deadline is February 1, 2020.  Applicants must be the first, but not sole, author of the paper and must have been studying at an educational institution in the United States at the time the paper was written, submitted, or published.
 
The Nininger Meteorite Award recipient receives $1,000 and an engraved plaque commemorating the honor.
 

Hypervelocity impacts in iron meteorites

Center Collection Curator Dr. Laurence Garvie and PhD Candidate Soumya Ray are co-authors on a new research paper published in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets.

The paper, Hypervelocity impact experiments in iron-nickel ingots and iron meteorites: Implications for the NASA Psyche mission, details the results of a series of high-velocity impact experiments performed on iron meteorites and cast metal ingots with iron and nickel compositions similar to iron meteorites.

These results will be utilized to interpret the nature and history of asteroid Psyche when the ASU-led  NASA Psyche mission reaches its destination.

Read the full paper, here!

Marchi S., Durda D. D., Polanskey C. A., Asphaug E., Bottke W. F., Elkins-Tanton L. T., Garvie, L. A. J., Ray S., Chocron S., and Williams D. A. (2019) Hypervelocity impact experiments in iron-nickel ingots and iron meteorites: Implications for the NASA Psyche mission. Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets. 24 October 2019. https://doi.org/10.1029/2019JE005927

NASA Psyche mission
The spacecraft’s structure will include power and propulsion systems to travel to, and orbit, the asteroid. These systems will combine solar power with electric propulsion to carry the scientific instruments used to study the asteroid through space.
The mission plans launch in 2022 and arrival at Psyche, between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter, in 2026. This selected asteroid is made almost entirely of nickel-iron metal. It offers evidence about violent collisions that created Earth and other terrestrial planets.
Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Arizona State Univ./Space Systems Loral/Peter Rubin.