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Click on the links and images below to explore our meteorite collection!

Stony Meteorites Chondrites Carbonaceous Chondrites Ordinary Chondrites Enstatite Chondrites Achondrites Primitive Achondrites Lunar Meteorites Martian Meteorites HED Meteorites Stony-Iron Meteorites Mesosiderites Pallasites Iron Meteorites

Stony Meteorites

Stony meteorites, the most common type of meteorite, are generally composed of approximately 75 – 90% silicon-based minerals, 10 – 25% nickel-iron alloy, and trace amounts of iron sulfide.

Stony meteorites account for ~94% of observed meteorite falls, and can be divided into two distinct categories: Chondrites and achondrites.

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Click on the images below to learn more about some of the stony meteorites in the Center for Meteorite Studies collection!

Aguas Zarcas meteorite

Chitado meteoritePlantersville meteoriteHamlet

Chondrites

The chondrites take their name from chondrules, the nearly spherical, silicate-rich particles they contain.  They are the most abundant type of stony meteorite, and contain some of the first objects to have formed in the Solar System, including calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) and chondrules.

Chondrites have never undergone melting.  Their chemistry is very primitive because they have had very few chemical interactions with other objects since their formation.

The most common meteorites found on Earth, chondrites account for approximately 86% of all meteorites recovered.

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Click on the images below to learn more about some of the chondrites in the Center for Meteorite Studies collection!

Hamlet

Karoonda meteorite

Carbonaceous Chondrites

Carbonaceous chondrites generally have Mg/Si ratios near the solar value, and oxygen isotope compositions that plot below the terrestrial fractionation line.

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Click on the images below to see examples of carbonaceous chondrites from the Center for Meteorite Studies collection!

Murchison meteoriteCrescentCoolidgeAguas Zarcas meteoriteKaroonda meteorite

Ordinary Chondrites

Ordinary chondrites generally show sub-solar Mg/Si and refractory/Si ratios, oxygen isotope compositions that plot above the terrestrial fractionation line, and a large volume percentage of chondrules, with only 10-15 volume percent fine-grained matrix.

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Click on the images below to learn more about some of the ordinary chondrites in the ASU Center for Meteorite Studies collection!

Arroyo AguiarSpadePlantersville meteoriteHamlet
Ramsdorf meteorite

Bensour

Enstatite Chondrites

Enstatite chondrites generally have sub-solar Mg/Si and refractory/Si ratios, oxygen isotope compositions that plot near the terrestrial fractionation line, and highly reduced mineral assemblages containing little FeO, Si-bearing metal, and sulfides of elements normally considered lithophile.

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Click on the images below to see some of the enstatite chondrites in the Center for Meteorite Studies collection!

Chitado meteorite

Achondrites

Achondrites lack chondrules, originate on differentiated planetary bodies (ie planetary bodies with a distinct core and crust), such as asteroids, planets, or moons, and were reformed from molten fragments that were flung into space as the result of another collision.

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Click on the images below to learn about some of the achondrites in the ASU Center for Meteorite Studies collection!

BishopvilleJohnstown meteoritePeckelsheim diogeniteIbitiraCumberland FallsAioun al Atrouss

Primitive Achondrites

The primitive achondrites are achondrite meteorites that retain chondrite characteristics such as relic chondrules and chemical composition as the result of extensive recrystallization or partial melting.

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Click on the images below to learn about some of the primitive achondrites in the ASU Center for Meteorite Studies collection!

HaveröNWA 725

Lunar Meteorites

These lunar rocks were ejected into space when another (asteroidal or cometary) object collided with the Moon with enough force to launch some of the impact-produced debris into Earth-crossing orbits.

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Click on the images below to learn more about some of the lunar meteorites in the ASU Center for Meteorite Studies collection!

NWA 5000NWA 5000

Martian Meteorites

These martian crustal rocks were ejected into space when another (asteroidal or cometary) object collided with Mars with enough force to launch some of the impact-produced debris into Earth-crossing orbits.

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Click on the images below to learn about some of the martian meteorites in the ASU Center for Meteorite Studies collection!
Nakhla

HED Meteorites

Members of the Howardite-Eucrite-Diogenite (HED) meteorite group are believed to have formed on the surface of asteroid 4-Vesta. According to radioisotope dating, the HED achondrites crystallized between 4.43 and 4.55 billion years ago.

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Click on the images below to learn more about some of the HED meteorites in the ASU Center for Meteorite Studies collection!

 TalampayaIbitiraJohnstown meteorite

Stony-Iron Meteorites

Stony-iron meteorites contain approximately even amounts of silicates and nickel-iron alloy, and are divided into two distinct groups: Pallasites and mesosiderites.

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Click on the images below to learn more about some of the stony-iron meteorites in the Center for Meteorite Studies collection!

Dong Ujimqin Qi

Springwater

Mesosiderites

Mesosiderites are brecciated stony-iron meteorites that contain nearly equal amounts of metal and silicates.

They are likely formed by collisions of metal-rich and silicate-rich asteroids, and their silicate portion is composed mainly of igneous rock fragments.

Fewer than 150 mesosiderites have been identified to date.

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Click on the images below to learn about some of the mesosiderites in the ASU Center for Meteorite Studies collection!

Dong Ujimqin Qi

Pallasites

Pallasites are believed to form between the silicate mantle, or outer shell, and molten metal core of a differentiated asteroid.

The primary silicate mineral in pallasites is olivine, distinguishable by its greenish hue.

The olivine crystals contained in the Marjalahti pallasite are of such consistently high purity that they were adopted as a scientific standard for the composition of olivine (aka the gemstone peridot).

Gem-quality peridot has been identified in multiple pallasite meteorites.

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Click on the images below to learn about some of the pallasites in the ASU Center for Meteorite Studies collection!

Oued Bourdim 001Springwater

Iron Meteorites

Most iron meteorites likely originated in the cores of large asteroids, and are composed almost entirely of nickel-iron alloy, which is also a primary component of the Earth’s core.

Even though iron meteorites account for less than 5% of observed falls, they are more easily recognized than other types of meteorites.

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Click on the images below to learn more about some of the iron meteorites in the ASU Center for Meteorite Studies collection!

Fairfield MeteoriteSterlitamak

ManitouwabingKayakent meteoriteSameliaRancho Gomelia