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CMS 60

Since 1961, the Arizona State University Center for Meteorite Studies has amassed and preserved one the world's largest meteorite collections to enable research in planetary science and cosmochemistry, and to inspire students, educators, and the general public to learn about the Solar System and our place in it.

Watch this space!

CMS60 CollageAll year, we’ll post stories of new research initiatives, exciting outreach programs, conservation and growth of the Center’s invaluable meteorite collection.

We invite you to follow us on social media, and share your memories and photos of the Center for Meteorite Studies using #CMS60.

CMS60: The oldest sedimentary rock in the Solar System is a meteorite

In 2017, Center Meteorite Curator Dr. Laurence Garvie published a ground-breaking paper in the journal Icarus. Co-authored with former Center Assistant Director and astrophysicist Dr. Melissa Morris and School of Earth and Space Exploration Professor (now Emeritus) and sedimentologist Dr. Paul Knauth, the paper (Sedimentary laminations in the Isheyevo (CH/CBb) carbonaceous chondrite formed by gentle […]

CMS60: Dishchii’bikoh Ts’iłsǫǫsé Tsee

To celebrate of 60 years of the Center for Meteorite Studies, we’re posting stories of historical Center events, new research initiatives, exciting outreach programs, conservation and growth of the Center’s invaluable meteorite collection. We invite you to follow us on social media, and share your memories and photos of the Center for Meteorite Studies using […]

Bringing the Moon to Arizona

To celebrate of 60 years of the Center for Meteorite Studies, we’re posting stories of historical Center events, new research initiatives, exciting outreach programs, conservation and growth of the Center’s invaluable meteorite collection. We invite you to follow us on social media, and share your memories and photos of the Center for Meteorite Studies using […]

Historic Center Research: Murchison

To celebrate of 60 years of the Center for Meteorite Studies, we’re posting stories of historical Center events, new research initiatives, exciting outreach programs, conservation and growth of the Center’s invaluable meteorite collection. We invite you to follow us on social media, and share your memories and photos of the Center for Meteorite Studies using […]

Founded on philanthropy

In 1957, Sputnik’s launch put space exploration at the forefront of the American conscience. The following year, Harvey H. Nininger, the famous meteorite hunter and self-taught meteoriticist, sold a portion of his collection to the British Natural History Museum. The Coordinator of Research at Arizona State University, George A. Boyd, was familiar with Nininger's collection […]