Korra Korrabes

November’s Meteorite of the Month is Korra Korrabes, an ordinary (H3) chondrite found in 1996, in Namaland, Namibia.
 
According to the Meteoritical Bulletin (MB 85):
A 22 kg stone plus 11 smaller pieces totaling ~18 kg were found in 1996 November in a dry river bed by a farmer who was searching for Gibeon irons. People searching with metal detectors recovered hundreds of additional buried, more weathered pieces within 50 m of the original material since 2000 November, bringing the total mass to ~120–130 kg. The largest specimen was used in a garden wall until 2000 August.
 
To date, 140 kg of Korra Korrabes have been recovered.
Korra Korrabes
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
This piece of Korra Korrabes measures 3 cm at its widest point. Photo: CMS/ASU.

New paper by Center researchers

A new paper, published in the journal Earth and Planetary Science Letters, by Center Assistant Director Dr. Devin Schrader and Center Assistant Research Scientist Dr. Jemma Davidson constrains the background temperature of the protoplanetary disk in the first four million years of the Solar System!  Authored with Dr. Steve Desch (ASU) and Dr. Roger Fu (Harvard University), the paper, titled "The background temperature of the protoplanetary disk within the first four million years of the Solar System", also provides a new test parameter for chondrule formation models based on newly determined low-temperature chondrule cooling rates.

Read the paper here – free to download until November 19th!

Chondrules are rounded, silicate-rich particles, and are the namesake of the chondrite meteorites.  Chondrites are the most abundant type of stony meteorite, and contain some of the first solids to have formed in the Solar System, including calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions, and chondrules.

2019 Nininger Student Travel Award Application Open

The Center for Meteorite Studies at Arizona State University is pleased to announce the application opportunity for the 2019 Nininger Student Travel Award for undergraduate and graduate students pursuing research in meteoritics and planetary sciences.

The Nininger Student Travel Award supports travel to the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference (LPSC) of up to 4 School of Earth & Space Exploration undergraduate and graduate students to present their latest results.

For details on the award and application process, click here!

2018 Nininger Meteorite Award Application Open

The Center for Meteorite Studies at Arizona State University is pleased to announce the application opportunity for the 2018 Nininger Meteorite Award for undergraduate and graduate students pursuing research in meteoritical sciences!
 
The Nininger Meteorite Award recognizes outstanding student achievement in the meteoritical sciences as embodied by an original research paper.  Papers must cover original research conducted by the student and must have been written, submitted, or published between January 1, 2017 and December 31, 2018. 
 
The 2017 Nininger Meteorite Award application deadline is January 19, 2019. Applicants must be the first, but not sole, author of the paper and must have been studying at an educational institution in the United States at the time the paper was written, submitted, or published.
 
The Nininger Award recipient receives $1,000 and an engraved plaque commemorating the honor.
 

Meteorites at Homecoming - Nov 3

Join the Center for Meteorite Studies for the 2018 ASU Homecoming Block Party!

CMS at Homecoming 2016Come out for the ultimate pre-game celebration this Saturday, November 3rd! Homecoming festivities begin at 9 AM, with a parade followed by the block party, filled with food, fun, entertainment, and more. Game time is 1 PM.

For more information, click here!

Saturday, Nov. 3
Block Party 9 AM to 1 PM
Old Main, on the Tempe Campus
Game time 1 PM

The ASU Homecoming Block Party and Parade is a festival-type of event that is free and open to the public.

On Saturday November 3, 4 hours to game time, the Homecoming Parade starts on University at Myrtle, heads east, crosses College Avenue and continues until McAllister. The parade passes through the center of the Block Party which starts with Devils on College, and the I zone at the Tooker House and continues south through University Drive and continues south to Tyler Mall. It is bordered on the west by Cady Mall , the “C Zone” and continues east to Palm Walk.

The Block Party boasts a 14 acre footprint with over 100 tents.

The event is family friendly with plenty of bike parking. Please do not bring dogs or pets to the event.

Center marks historic anniversary

This week marks a historic anniversary in the Center for Meteorite Studies!

On the evening of Tuesday, October 7th, 1969, Center Founding Director Carleton Moore, Center Curator Chuck Lewis, Center graduate student Bob Kelly, and LECO salesperson Mitch Schwartz crowded into the Center's laboratory to conduct the very first carbon analysis of a lunar sample. Director Moore was extremely relieved when the first sample of lunar regolith began to register a reading – there was carbon in the lunar samples and they were analyzing it!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Center curator Chuck Lewis in the laboratory.

The Center's experience and success in analyzing carbon in meteorites had led to Director Moore's inclusion on the Lunar Sample Preliminary Examination Team (LSPET), the group of scientists assigned to analyze the samples returned by the Apollo astronauts.

While the first samples returned by the Apollo 11 mission were almost entirely analyzed in the Lunar Receiving Laboratory at the Manned Spacecraft Center (now known as Johnson Spaceflight Center), because the ASU Center for Meteorite Studies was the only facility with the analytical machinery in place for proven carbon analyses, Director Moore flew to Houston to pick up the Apollo 11 samples and hand carried them back to ASU for analysis, along with graduate student Everett Gibson.

Moon in transit 1969

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CMS Director Carleton Moore and graduate student Everett Gibson transporting Apollo lunar samples to ASU. Photo: Jan Young.

Director Moore and his team carried out the carbon analyses for LSPET on the Apollo 15, 16 and 17 samples at ASU, ultimately analyzing over 200 lunar samples.

Read more about the Center's historic lunar analyses here!

2018 Nininger Meteorite Award Application Open

The Center for Meteorite Studies at Arizona State University is pleased to announce the application opportunity for the 2018 Nininger Meteorite Award for undergraduate and graduate students pursuing research in meteoritical sciences!
 
The Nininger Meteorite Award recognizes outstanding student achievement in the meteoritical sciences as embodied by an original research paper.  Papers must cover original research conducted by the student and must have been written, submitted, or published between January 1, 2017 and December 31, 2018. 
 
The 2017 Nininger Meteorite Award application deadline is January 19, 2019. Applicants must be the first, but not sole, author of the paper and must have been studying at an educational institution in the United States at the time the paper was written, submitted, or published.
 
The Nininger Award recipient receives $1,000 and an engraved plaque commemorating the honor.
 

2019 Nininger Student Travel Award Application Open

The Center for Meteorite Studies at Arizona State University is pleased to announce the application opportunity for the 2019 Nininger Student Travel Award for undergraduate and graduate students pursuing research in meteoritics and planetary sciences.

The Nininger Student Travel Award supports travel to the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference (LPSC) of up to 4 School of Earth & Space Exploration undergraduate and graduate students to present their latest results.

For details on the award and application process, click here!

Dwaleni

October’s Meteorite of the Month is Dwaleni, an ordinary (H4-6) chondrite that fell the morning of October 12, 1970, near Nhlangano, Swaziland.
 
According to the Meteoritical Bulletin (MB 50):
Explosions, variously described as eight distinct explosions, a series of crackling explosions, three explosions and a series of staccato reports, accompanied disintegration of the meteorite over southwest Swaziland. The descent of fragments was marked by a high pitched whine. All three fragments recovered are hard aerolite, similar in appearance and distinctly magnetic. They are irregular in shape but smooth surfaced with characteristic rounded indentations. Overall black-brown crusting with an irregular pattern of cracks is common to all three. The two smaller fragments were fractured and broken on impact and display disseminated sulfide. Specimen A was found buried in moist soil with its lowermost surface at a depth of 18 cm below groundlevel. Specimen B was buried to a similar depth in moist soil in a ploughed field. Specimen C was buried at an estimated depth of 15 cm in moist, pebbly soil on a boulder strewn hillside. It is estimated that 20% of Specimen C was splintered off on impact and was scattered as variously sized chips, only a few of which were recovered. All three specimens had been dug out before the sites were visited. It would appear that the directions of descent were vertical or near vertical.
 
To date, Dwaleni is the only meteorite to be classified from Swaziland, and over 3 kg have been recovered.
Dwaleni
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
This piece of Dwaleni measures 2.5 cm at its widest point.  Photo: CMS/ASU.